Print ISSN 1738-3684
On-line ISSN 1976-3026
 
 
Abstract
Volume 7. Number 3. Pages 208-14 (2010) - Original Article  
   
Frontal Dysfunction Underlies Depression in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A FDG-PET Study
 
Hye Sook Lee1;Il Han Choo1;Dong Young Lee1,2;Jee Wook Kim1;Eun Hyun Seo2;Shin Gyeom Kim3;Shin Young Park4;Ji Hye Shin1;Ki Woong Kim5; and Jong Inn Woo1,2;
1;Departments of Neuropsychiatry and
2;Interdisciplinary Program for Cognitive Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul,
3;Department of Neuropsychiatry, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon,
4;Department of Neuropsychiatry, Daerim St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul,
5;Department of Neuropsychiatry, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea


Objective : Depression is a very common symptom in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and in those with clinically evident AD. Moreover, MCI individuals with depression show a higher conversion rate to clinical AD than those without depression. This study aimed to elucidate the functional neuroanatomical substrate of depression in MCI.

Methods : Thirty-six patients were recruited from a University Hospital-based cohort; 18 of these subjects had MCI with depression (MCI_D); the remaining 18 subjects were age- and gender-matched, and had MCI with no depression (MCI_ND). For comparison, 16 cognitively normal (CN) elderly individuals were also included. All subjects underwent Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) scanning and regional cerebral glucose metabolism was compared among the three groups by a voxel-based method. The relationship between severity of depression, as measured by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) scores, and glucose metabolism was also investigated.

Results : MCI_D showed lower glucose metabolism in the right superior frontal gyrus than MCI_ND. There was a significant negative correlation between HRSD score and glucose metabolism at the same frontal region for overall MCI subjects. When compared with CN, both MCI_D and MCI_ND showed decreased glucose metabolism in the precuneus, while MCI_D had, in addition, reduced metabolism in other diffuse brain regions.

Conclusion : Given previous observations on depression in AD, our results suggest that functional disruption of the frontal region, known to be associated with primary or other secondary depression, underlies depression in preclinical AD as well as clinically evident AD.


Key Words
Mild cognitive impairment;Depression;Frontal;Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography.
 
   
 


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